Tuesday, March 22, 2011

March Morsels of International Masonophobia

A March 17th story on NPR about internal struggles as Italy celebrated its 150th anniversary of unification talked about the battle between the southern part of the country and the separatist Northern League, that has long wanted the country split in two.

From "A Divided Italy Prepares For Unification Anniversary" by Sylvia Poggioli:

At a recent rally, League supporters hailed "a free Padania," their idealized independent statelet, named after the Latin word for the River Po. Supporters also hailed the recent burning in effigy of unity hero Giuseppe Garibaldi.

"Garibaldi was a mercenary," one man said, "financed by English Freemasons."

"He was not a saint," another broke in.

Northern Italy is one of Europe's richest regions, and League leader Umberto Bossi did not hide his ultimate goal. "The Northern League is the political force of the north, and we can defeat anyone who tries to block us," he said.

Before 1861, Italy was a patchwork of city-states and regions ruled by the pope or foreign monarchs. The Austrian statesman Metternich famously described Italy as a "mere geographical expression," convinced it could never achieve nationhood.

Meanwhile, over in Iran (there's a sentence I have never typed before), also on March 17th, the Tehran Times printed an analysis by Khalid Amayreh, who seems to have determined just who was running things in Egypt before their recent revolutions in the street.

You guessed it. Joooz and Freemasons.

From "Navigating Egypt According to Zionist Compass":

During the recent Egyptian revolution which deposed the tyrant Hosni Mubarak, Israel and its Zionist and Masonic tentacles in Europe and North America pressured government circles to do whatever could be done to shield and preserve the decadent Mubarak regime, but of course to no avail.

1 comment:

47th Problem of Euclid said...

There is some argument to be made that the Piedmontese, via Garibaldi and others, conquered Southern Italy and the islands in order to form a unified Italian state. Antonio Gramsci's The Southern Question deals with the perspective the Southern Italians had of being a conquered people. That Freemasonry allied itself with such a conquest, if indeed such a conquest can be said to have taken place, is another question.