Wednesday, March 10, 2010

North Dakota to Charter Yellowstone Historic Lodge No. 88 in May


Historic Ft. Buford in North Dakota is located at the confluence of the Yellowstone and Missouri rivers. Lewis and Clark camped here in their exploration of the West. And it was here that Sitting Bull and his decimated Sioux followers surrendered in 1881. The fort itself closed in 1895, and is partially restored and run as an historic site by the North Dakota State Historical Society.

On May 21st and 22nd, 2010, the Grand Lodge of North Dakota will charter Yellowstone Historic Lodge No. 88 at Ft. Buford, about 20 miles southwest of Williston, ND. The first Masonic charter in what was to become North Dakota was issued to Yellowstone Lodge No. 88 by the Grand Lodge of Minnesota in 1872. It had a membership of 50 Brothers who were members of the 7th Cavalry at Ft. Buford, local businessmen, farmers and others. The story of Yellowstone No. 88 can be read here.

According to an article in in the MSA Notes from last September 2009 by Jim Savaloja, PGM and Associate Grand Historian, Grand Lodge of North Dakota:

These Brothers built an 80’ by 100’ two story Lodge Hall at the western edge of the Fort. The upper story was the Lodge room and the lower section was the social event center for the Fort and the surrounding community. This Lodge was active until 1874 when the Fort became dormant and the Charter was returned to the Grand Lodge of Minnesota. The Lodge building was sold and later dismantled.


The Ft. Buford Masonic Historical site today is marked by large granite boulder inscribed with the brief history.

The first Masonic charter issued to Prince Hall Masons in North Dakota was carried by the Buffalo Soldiers of the 25th Infantry, in 1892. The 25th Infantry was one of just four all-black units in the U.S. military at that time. Eureka Lodge No. 135 PHA was chartered as a military lodge by the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Missouri when the soldiers were stationed at Ft. Apache in the Arizona Territory in 1891.

On Friday, May 21st, the historical exhibit will open, followed by a barbecue at 6:20 PM. On Saturday, May 22nd, there will be a public opening and historic program at the Williston Airport International Inn from 10AM-12PM, with a rededication ceremony instituting the historic lodges between 2PM-4PM. A banquet will follow at 7PM at the International Airport Inn. This event is co-sponsored by the Grand Lodge of North Dakota A.F. & A.M, the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Missouri, the North Dakota State Historical Society, and the North Dakota Masonic Foundation.

For more information contact the Grand Lodge of North Dakota at 701-235-8321.

1 comment:

Buffalo Soldier 9 said...

Keep telling that history:

Read the novel, Rescue at Pine Ridge, "RaPR", where Buffalo Bill Cody meets a Buffalo Soldier. A great story of black military history...the first generation of Buffalo Soldiers.

How do you keep a people down? ‘Never' let them 'know' their history.

The 7th Cavalry got their butts in a sling again after the Little Big Horn Massacre, fourteen years later, the day after the Wounded Knee Massacre. If it wasn't for the 9th Cavalry Buffalo Soldiers, there would of been a second massacre of the 7th Cavalry.

Read the novel, “Rescue at Pine Ridge”, 5 stars Amazon, Barnes & Noble and the youtube trailer commercial...and visit the website http://www.rescueatpineridge.com

I hope you’ll enjoy the novel. I wrote it from my mini-series movie of the same title, “RaPR” to keep my story alive. Hollywood has had a lot of strikes and doesn't like telling our stories...its been “his-story” of history all along…until now. The movie so far has attached, Bill Duke directing, Hill Harper, Glynn Turman and a host of other major actors in which we are in talks with…see imdb.com at; http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0925633/

When you get a chance, also please visit our Alpha Wolf Production website at; http://www.alphawolfprods.com and see our other productions, like Stagecoach Mary, the first Black Woman to deliver mail for Wells Fargo in Montana, in the 1890's, “spread the word”.