Thursday, June 12, 2014

UGLE Restores Recognition of GLNF

The United Grand Lodge of England on June 11th has restored recognition of the Grande Loge Nationale Française, according to François Koch on his La Lumiere blog.  Several US grand lodges, including Indiana, have restored recognition of the embattled GLNF already after they gave former Grand Master Stifani the boot and did much internal work to fix their problems. But for the UGLE to re-recognize GLNF is major news, making the GLNF again the only major recognized grand lodge (of a dozen or so) in France. This should come as a relief to the brethren of France.

H/T to Mohamad Yatim

3 comments:

Steven Vanek said...

This is not only major news, but excellent news as well.

Whenever Grand Lodges can work together to resolve issues and once again find each other in amity, it is truly a great thing.

Hopefully they can keep their hands extended in token of friendship for a long time.

Thomas Johnson said...

I concur with Vanek's comment. This is, "excellent news."

Since the early days, through the remarkable relationship of Washington and Lafayette or the origins of The Scottish Rite and Martinism, we can see France has always played a major part in the Perennial Philosophy which sustains Freemasonry.

Good job by the Masonic leadership of the UGLE, France, and the U.S.A.

Jimmy Koppen said...

Well, not all problems are solved yet. There are more than 78.000 'regular' Freemasons in France today. Only 25.000 of them belong to a Lodge under the jurisdiction of the GLNF. This means that 53.000 brethren are working in Lodges and Grand Lodges that follow the 1929 Basic Principles, but are not recognized by the UGLE. The two largest of these Grand Loges, the Grand Lodge of France (33.000 members) and the Grande Loge d'Alliance maçonnique de France, consisting out of 14.000 brethren who left the GLNF in 2012, joined hands in a new organization, the Masonic Confederation of France. The main goal, and perhaps the only ambition, of that Confederation is to obtain international recognition. So what is going to happen next?
Not to mention that France also counts about 100.000 'irregular' Freemasons.